Energy

No nuclear material misused in the EU in 2014

No nuclear material misused in the EU in 2014

Monday, 21 December 2015
Updated
Monday, 21 December 2015

In 2014 there was no case of nuclear material being diverted from its declared purpose – or misused - according to the European Commission’s annual report on the implementation of nuclear safeguards in 2014.

Euratom Safeguards’ was established under the 1957 Euratom Treaty to make sure that fissile nuclear material such as uranium and plutonium is not diverted from its intended use by the users, and is used only for peaceful purposes in the EU.

The rules on nuclear safeguards oblige users of fissile nuclear material to maintain records and to make declarations about the nuclear material they hold and submit it to the European Commission. The Commission then verifies these reports to assure citizens, supplier states and the international community that the nuclear material in the EU is used solely for peaceful purposes.

The 2014 report pointed out that the amount of nuclear material in the EU is steadily increasing, as the EU’s nuclear power fleet requires a constant supply of uranium ore and continues to produce spent fuel.  This, coupled with the continued threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism, will “be met by a more stringent application of the rules contained in the Euratom Treaty”, the report said.

1,234 nuclear installation inspections were carried out in 2014, 643 of which were joint inspections with the International Atomic Energy Agency.

2014 nuclear safeguards annual report

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